Storing Multiple Foods in the Same Bucket

by Micky

Can I store multiple items in a single bucket? My plan is make single serving packages with the Food Saver and store in sealed Mylar in 5 gallon buckets. I would like to make each bucket a mix of beans, rice, sugar, salt etc. Is this possible?


Not only is it possible, it's a great idea. Some people are storing foods in one bucket that can be combined for the whole meal (minus any fresh ingredients, of course). Just be sure each individual packet of food is properly sealed and airtight.

Comments for Storing Multiple Foods in the Same Bucket

Click here to add your own comments

Single Servings
by: Kerry

I would love to know more about your idea for storing single serving packages. Could you post more involved descriptions?

by: Joan

I'm not sure exactly what you would like me to describe, but here's what I would do. Take a favorite recipe and package the ingredients in either single servings or family-size servings. Put all ingredients, sealed tight with oxygen absorbers in each, or use a vacuum food sealer. Then put all into a bucket, label stating the ingredients and the date.

Let's use an example of Basic Biscuit Mix:
8 C. flour
1 C. dry milk
1/4 C. baking powder
4 tsp. salt
1-1/3 C. shortening
1/3-1/2 C. water or milk

I would put all of these dry ingredients together in a sealed bag, label and date. (Leave out the shortening and water or milk.) Make as many packets of this recipe as will fit into a 5-6 gallon bucket. Label and date the bucket. This will make rotation of your mix easy - just take out a packet of biscuit mix as needed.

You could do the same with a brownie recipe or cookie or cake recipe.

Here's another way to do it - package individual bags of each product and store them all in the same bucket. Watch the second video on Food Storage Containers for a demonstration of exactly how to do this.

That being said, I personally have not done this. I prefer to cook entire meals and freeze in individual servings. This is the method I will use - until we don't have electricity. If and when there is no electricity, I will use our freeze dried foods as they come with all the ingredients and are cooked, freeze dried and ready to eat by adding a little water.

I hope this answered your question.

by: Dianne

You talked about using bags for storing different items in the same bucket. What kind of bags are best to use?

I'm new to your site and love it, thank you.


Thank you, Dianne. I'm glad you like my site and I hope it's helpful.

Any food grade bag will work. If you have a vacuum sealer, the bags used for that would be perfect. If not, Ziploc freezer bags will work as they are strong and made especially to contain food.

Ziploc bags on their own are not airtight, so O2 aborbers will not work inside of them. But if you put food in Ziploc bags and then put them all into a Mylar bag inside a 5-6 gallon bucket and add O2 absorbers, this will work fine.

Multiple food types inside same mylar bag?
by: Marcus

I believe you may have touched on this on the recipe bag issue, but can I put different types of food in the same Mylar bag? Like instead of all kidney beans could I do a couple one pound bags of kidney, a couple lima, a couple chick peas, etc and then seal all of these into the same Mylar bag and place into 5 gal bucket?


Yes, you can. I think this is a great idea.

Flavors Blending in Bags Stored in Tub?
by: Sue

I currently have carrots, onions, raisins, apples, mixed veggies, etc. in individual ziploc and/or food saver vacuum sealed bags. These are in an 18 gal. plastic tub from WalMart. I've put them in temporarily until I have enough bags to open my o2 absorbers, 60 ct.

Two questions: I THINK I am smelling various items when I open the tub; are these odors escaping thru the ziploc bags even though they are sealed - should I separate these items?

Question #2: I bought 300 cc o2 absorbers thinking that's what I needed for a quart jar - could I use them in that size or a gallon ziploc bag? Is it possible to "overdo" the oxygen step?

Sorry for the questions, but it's a whole new adventure for me! Thanks, and I love this site!

Flavors Blending in Bags Stored in Tub?
by: Joan


Please don't be sorry for the questions! I'm certain there are many others wondering the same things and will be grateful that you asked.

Question 1: If you are smelling odors, then they are escaping the bags. I am guessing that the odors will escape the Ziploc bags rather than the vacuum sealed ones, only because there is no air to escape the vacuum sealed bags. You may only be smelling the onions - they are very pungent and it's difficult to contain their scent except in sealed bottles or cans.

Question 2: 300 cc O2 absorbers are fine for quart jars. Ziplock bags however cannot be made airtight - not even with O2s.

It is not possible to "overdo" the oxygen step. Just an example: Nitro-Pak sells 500 cc oxygen absorbers and uses 2-3 absorbers in their 6-gallon buckets of food.

The number of O2s are determined by:

1) The contents of the bucket - macaroni, for example, leaves more oxygen in the bucket than powdered milk.

2) Altitude: More absorbers are needed when packing food at sea level than at higher altitudes. Nitro-Pak, for instance, is at 6000 ft. above sea level; therefore, they need only use 2-3 500 cc oxygen absorbers when packing their 6-gallon buckets. Packing food at sea level would require 3-4 500 cc O2s for a 6-gallon bucket.

I hope I have adequately answered your questions, and thanks for asking them. I'm happy that you love my site. Please feel free to ask any other questions you might have.


Storing in Buckets
by: Tina

I want to store 1 gal. Mylar sealed bags filled with various types of beans in a bucket. I'm putting a 300 cc. oxygen absorber in each bag. Does the bucket have to be food grade or can I use cheaper Home Depot covered plastic buckets? Thanks.


That would probably work, but the reason for using the food grade 6-gallon buckets is that they have lids that seal tight. If the buckets you mention have a good seal, I see no reason not to use them.

Multiple food stored in the same bucket
by: Dee

I did this to 10 different buckets. Inside each bucket I put rice, instant mashed potatoes, several different kinds of noodles and pasta, tea bags, instant oat meal, gravy mix, dried beans etc. enough for a two week meal. I first took the food and vacuum sealed it with an 02 absorber and then placed it in a mylar bag with a bay leaf (heard this would keep bugs out). Then I placed it in a food grade bucket with a mylar bag and added more bay leaves and sealed the bucket. I put a label on each bucket with the contents listed along with the date. I figured I could get at least 5 years or longer out of these buckets.

Food Grade Buckets
by: Dee

I bought my food grade buckets and lids at Lowe's. the bucket was around $3 and the lid was a little over a dollar. I have about $5 in a food grade bucket. Also, I have read, never use colored buckets, for the chemicals could leak into your food.

by: Julie

When preparing multiple items for storage, I cut the Mylar bags to fit the items it needs to cover. For example, the gallon Mylar bag if cut in half and resealed on the side will accommodate a 1 lbs package of spaghetti. so I put together 4 packages of 1 lb pasta in separate Mylar bags. I then put spices in their own Mylar, soup mixes in a few Mylars, etc., whatever I think I would use in a few weeks. I LEAVE THE MYLARS UNSEALED AT THE TOP, as I put all the Mylars into a FoodSaver bag. Once the FoodSaver bag is sealed, the Mylar covers the contents of the food and is airtight! This way when I use the items, I can reuse the Mylars and the FoodSaver bags.

Storage of Oxygen Absorbers
by: EZ

After I open a package of oxygen absorbers packets and use one or a few in the mylar storage bags I need to store the remaining packets in a vacuum. I put them in a Mason jar and vacuum seal the jar using the FoodSaver sealer device which is made for that purpose and any vacuum source. When I need more absorbers I open the jar, take as many as I need and reseal it.

Click here to add your own comments

Return to Long Term Food Storage.

Top of Pagetop of page