Long Term Storage of Distilled Water

by Burt
(USA)

5-gallon collapsible water carrier

5-gallon collapsible water carrier

5-gallon collapsible water carrier
5-gallon stackable water container
55-gallon water container

I store distilled water. Is there anything I should know about that?

ANSWER:

There isn't much to know about it other than if you search on the web you will find many myths about storing distilled water. It's about as pure as you can get. If it tastes funny after years of storage, it's because of lack of oxygen - that's it.

I don't know what type of container you are storing the water in, but the only consensus I have read about is that the store-bought plastic bottles are not good for long term storage. They are made of a plastic that is too thin and may spontaneously break. The water may also leach some of the plastic compounds, which would render your water no longer pure.

The best storage containers for distilled water are clean glass bottles or jugs.

And that's about all there is to know about storing distilled water.

Here is the page where I read about all the myths – if you’re interested. http://www.durastill.com/myths.html

Thanks for writing. I appreciate learning along with you.

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Water Storage in Milk Jugs

Is it ok to store water in plastic milk jugs?

ANSWER:

No, not for long term storage of water. Now days, plastic containers are rated and classified - you may have seen the letters "PETE" or "PET" or "HDPE" on containers.The FDA requires that plastic used for juices or soda pop be food grade and therefore must be rated "PETE". All long term water storage containers are also rated "PETE" (or should be - if they're not, don't use them).


Milk jugs, on the other hand usually have an “HDPE” rating and are not suitable for long-term water storage use. Why? I can only surmise that the difference is in the storage of milk versus juices and soda pop - milk is kept in the refrigerator while juices and pop can be, but don't need to be refrigerated.

The theory is that a food grade plastic container rated "PETE/PET" is safer when exposed to heat. So a rating of "HDPE" is good enough for milk as it is refrigerated. However, the breakdown of plastics or leaching of chemicals into foods only occurs under constant exposure to 80 degrees or more.


Having said that, it’s perfectly safe to use plastic containers which have a “PET or PETE” classification so long as they are not washed and used repeatedly. Use up the soda pop or juice, clean thoroughly, and then fill it with tap water. Store them in a cool place. Reusing liter and gallon juice and soda bottles is certainly better than having no water storage but pay attention the to rating/classification of the plastic.

Here's more information on storing water long term.

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Water Storage in Liter Pop Bottles

by Linda
(Illinois)


I have been storing water in 2 liter bottles with chlorine added. I recently purchased a Big Berkey water purifier. My question is, do I need to continue adding chlorine to water since I will be purifying the water before drinking and do I need to continue rotating water? Am I ok to just clean bottles and store the water indefinitely until I purify it in my Berkey?

ANSWER:

There is no need to put chlorine in water for storage if your culinary water already has it. As far as I know, all public culinary water in the U.S. has chlorine so, no, it's not necessary to add it to water being stored. If, however, you have well water, it's best to add a couple of drops for long term storage.

Berkey or not, there is no need to put chlorine in stored water if there is chlorine in your culinary water. There is also no need to rotate water storage. Do you have any idea how long our water is stored before it reaches our home? Years! Just filter it as needed, when needed. Your only concern should be to check for leaking bottles or containers.

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Water for Long Term Use

by Evelyn Candela
(Ashtabula,OH U.S.A.)

Great for water storage - and it's stackable!

Great for water storage - and it's stackable!

If I were to freeze several jugs of water in my chest freezer for use in the supposed upcoming "doomsday", would that be logical?

I do not use the whole freezer anymore and thought that this would be good for any future use-just take it out and let thaw.

Do you have any idea of "shelf" life?

ANSWER:

It's not a bad idea, but I see no reason to freeze water for storage. It won't increase the shelf life of the water. Most water in the U.S. is chlorinated out of the tap so it's okay just to fill some appropriate water containers for later use - whenever that might be.

Water doesn't have a "shelf life" per se. It may have a funny taste after several years but that is because of the lack of oxygen. Stir it up and it will taste fine.

If you think the water is contaminated somehow after years of storage, remember that it is still water. Just boil it or run it though a water purifying filter - something like the Katadyn Water Filter.

As for the space in your freezer, can I use it? Mine is too small and is full! I'd say fill it up with things you like to eat. :)

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Water Storage Containers

by Joe

5 Gallon Collapsible Water Container

5 Gallon Collapsible Water Container

5 Gallon Collapsible Water Container
5 Gallon Water Container

Regarding water storage, are 5 gal water bottle containers acceptable?

ANSWER
Yes. Any type like those pictured above are just fine.

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